[Q] is for Queues

20140419_114841I have come to the point where my drafts, ideas and notes are on so many different papers, in so many different places and in different forms that I am getting lost in them. For me to function, I need to stay organised however my strongly developed sense for neat piles and lists is being seriously challenged by this overflow of things that wants to be finished.

Pros: I have ideas.

Cons: The aforementioned ideas are in the queue waiting to be developed into meaningful or otherwise publishable pieces.

And queues are the thing I have a problem with. I am not patient. For me to join a queue means that whatever is at the end of the queue is life-and-death important. Otherwise I wouldn’t bother. Queues hinder progress. I live in the UK. The British citizens are very organised while queuing. I have never thought I will find a nation so immersed in the culture of queuing. Then I visited Brazil. Let’s just say that the conclusion of this trip in regards to the issue of queuing is that the United Kingdom has still a lot to learn.

My queues are based on tiredness, formed around lack of time, mixed with impatience and a dollop of laziness. They are flavoured with the fear of failure and soaked in the despair of self-doubt. No wonder I’m avoiding them. Please someone tell me to stop moaning and get over it. Please, I beg you.

Q in the A to Z challenge.

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. trentpmcd
    Apr 19, 2014 @ 13:50:59

    Funny word, queue. As an American I usually use queue in a technical sense – the job (program/printout/etc) is in the queue waiting to run. When we think of the British using the term it is usually synonymous with our use of the word “line” – there was a long queue at the market. Here you use it in a non-technical sense for something waiting to be done – the items on your to-do list are queued, the stack of books are queued to be read, etc. It makes perfect sense but I’ve never seen it used this way. I guess one benefit of blogging is the new insights you gain into cultures you thought you knew so well.

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